Need a Speaker at your Steampunk Event? I’m Your Gal!

I recently created a page with a list of 30 different talks I can do at Steampunk conventions and other special events. I absolutely LOVE getting up and talking in front of an audience, and I know event organizers are always hungry for content. Sounds like a match made in heaven to me!

I will keep the page updated as I add new topics, and I am also very open to researching a new topic or catering an existing talk to your event’s theme. Feel free to e-mail about appearances at Phoebe @ PhoebeDarqueling.com.

Topics for Talks

The 30 Years of Steampunk Exhibit and Lecture this weekend in Cincinnati!

Happy Birthday, Steampunk!

In just 24 short hours, I’ll be hitting the road once again to report on an amazing Steampunk event. This is my second time visiting the International Steampunk Symposium, but this year I’m going as more than just a reporter.

When the convention organizers approached me about curating an exhibit documenting the last 30 years of Steampunk, I dusted off my Museum Studies MA and put together something that came out rather splendid. (With the assistance of fellow writer and layout wizard, P.R. Chase)

The exhibit will be on view from April 28-30 in Cincinnati at the Symposium (on “Baker Street”), with a possibility for another venue later this summer.

Symposium attendees can also catch my talk on the exhibit either Saturday 4:30pm or Sunday 1:30pm. In addition, I’ll be speaking about infusing the steam era with supernatural elements (Fri 10pm) and the relationship between aether and alchemy (Sat 8pm).

If you can’t make it to the Symposium, don’t fret! After the dust has settled from back to back conventions, Steampunk Journal readers will get to experience the exhibit as a weekly series of articles.

Subscribe to Steampunk Journal

Here’s a little taste:

Check out the Edwardian Ball, New Orleans Report on Steampunk Journal

After my successful Kickstarter campaign, I got the chance to visit New Orleans and attend the Edwardian Ball. I’ll be posting all kinds of tasty haunted and historical tidbits from my time in the Big Easy later this year. But in the meantime, you can read all about the fabulous Steampunk charity event for the Edward Gorey Trust.

Read the full story on Steampunk Journal

 

Just ONE WEEK Left if you Want the Inside Scoop on the Edwardian Ball in New Orleans! – New Rewards Added

Time is running out …

I was offered the chance of a lifetime, but I can’t take advantage without your help.

As the new US Editor for Steampunk Journal, I’ve been given the opportunity to report on the Edwardian Ball, a fantastic charity even taking place in New Orleans on March 25. But beyond the Journal, I am writing a series of books and several of them take place in New Orleans! (Read a teaser or the full Chapter 1)

This is an incredible opportunity for me to conduct research to give my books and the setting the full, rich treatment it deserves. I have lived in or visited many of places where Vi travels during the course of Mistress of None, but the Big Easy isn’t one of them. I chose it for its history, and it’s reputation as one of the world’s “Most Haunted” cities.

Not only will I report on the Ball for Steampunk Journal, but I plan to bring all kinds of wonderful historical tidbits and spooky facts about New Orleans to followers of PhoebeDarqueling.com. But only if you help me get there next weekend! If you can see it in your heart to forego just ONE coffee, I can take this important journey down my writing path.

marco-sanchez-edwardian-ball-2017-187

Visit the campaign page

Butterfly Shadowbox
Yours for a $50 pledge to my Kickstarter campaign!

I will also be offering prints of your favorite photos from the event, the Steampunk Journal report in your inbox early, and one of a kind works of art like the shadowbox you see here, but you get to see your name on both Steampunk Journal and PhoebeDarqueling.com!

Review: Victorian Vices at Ed Fringe 2014

The Durham-based company, Another Soup, has two back-to-back shows this year at the Space on Niddry St. Both are promenade musicals, meaning that the actors move in and out of the audience to give them an immersive experience. I have never seen a show like these before and I thought the approach was interesting, though better suited to Sweeny Todd and the String of Pearls than to a Picture of Dorian Gray. In Sweeny Todd, the ‘ladies of the night’ and other patrons of Mrs. Lovett’s shop wend their way through the audience going through purses and trading hats with members of the crowd, which was engaging and silly fun during a tale of gruesome murders. But the side characters in Dorian Gray were aristocrats (though similarly gin-soaked by the end) which didn’t lend itself to the same treatment, and the larger crowd made it difficult for a short person stuck in the middle of the pack (ie, me) to see most of the action.

The lighting situation was also more favorable to Sweeny Todd, and faces were never lost behind the shadows of the audience, where Dorian Gray could have benefited from even one light in Dorian’s chambers when tall patrons between the single bank of lights and the small but lovely set sometimes totally obliterated the well-executed efforts of the cast. The audience is expected to stand and move about during the shows, as well as occasionally dancing with the actors, something I wish I had known before spending the whole day at the National Museum of Scotland and then seeing the shows one after the other. By the time I got home my feet were killing me! So be prepared if you are planning to see them both. (People with health issues are welcome to sit during the performances but they will definitely miss some of the action.)

Captured surreptitiously but posted with permission during Sweeny Todd
Captured surreptitiously but posted with permission during Sweeny Todd

So let’s take them one at a time.

Sweeny Todd and the String of Pearls is adapted from a serialized tale called The String of Pearls: A Romance, which took place in 1785 and was first published as a serial in 1846-47. The story has been adapted for stage and screen many times over, but in case you aren’t familiar with it, here’s the short version. Sweeny Todd is a barber on Fleet Street in London. He kills his victims (sometimes through breaking their necks and sometimes giving them too close a shave with his straight-edge razor) and then disposes of the bodies by giving them to his neighbor, Mrs. Lovett, to bake into meat pies at a time when meat is very scarce in the darker corners of the city. In Another Soup’s version, the story takes place in the 1850s during the Great Stink and the Cholera epidemic of 1858 but the main plot is still the same. Depending on the adaptation, Todd and Lovett are business partners, friends or lovers, and in this version they are most decidedly the latter, sometimes carrying on their affair while the main action of the show takes place elsewhere. It is Todd’s affection for Mrs. Lovett, who commits the first two murders, that leads him to help her with the cover up and makes him her “supplier” for her meat pies. Business is booming so Lovett needs an assistant, which eventually leads to their discovery and downfall.

Captured surreptitiously but posted with permission during Sweeny Todd
Captured surreptitiously but posted with permission during Sweeny Todd

The music was played by a live band including an accordian that sometimes was in the thick of it with the actors. The enthusiasm of the cast was infectious and the singing was well blended and balanced. I enjoyed having the sound come from all around me when the actors were sprinkled throughout the crowd. Todd and Lovett were very well cast and did a splendid job, as did the playful smaller parts. Unfortunately, if you are right next to the band you lose a lot of the lyrics, which were in general much stronger writing than the dialog. The music is clearly the focus of the show, but when the actors don’t have mics it can be hard to follow.

For the best experience, I would suggest that you stand near the corner of the room where the two sets come together so you can get the most out the singing but still hear the music clearly. Be prepared to move during the show and come back together in a different configuration. I loved this aspect because it allowed people who had not had as good of a vantage point in the beginning to see more of the show later. So even if you start out at the back, be patient and you will get a chance to see, plus more of a chance to interact with the side characters. The crowd for this show was smaller than for Dorian Gray, and I think the group of 30 or so in the audience is the right size for the venue.

_2014VICTORK_AJXAfter about a 30 minute break where we rested our feet by sitting on the stone steps outside, we went back in for round 2. The Picture of Dorian Gray was the first show I found on the Ed Fringe docket to write about for Victorian and Steampunk inspiration and I was the most excited to see it. Sweeny Todd I had seen as a musical before, but never Dorian Gray and I was intrigued. The story centers on Dorian, a lovely youth seduced by the delectable debaucheries of the Victorian age, his mentor, Lord Henry Wotton, and the painter of his portrait, Basil Hallward. Upon seeing his portrait, he wishes that he could always stay as young and beautiful as it is, and in wishing makes a pact with the devil. Dorian falls in love with an actress, but later rejects her when she wants to quit the stage, which leads to her suicide. When he later looks at the portrait, it has changed and started to become ugly to reflect the decay of his soul while he remains the same.

The three main male roles were perfectly cast, though I think the strain of so many performances was starting show in their voices (and who can blame them!). The music and especially the female chorus voices were lovely (and the “sisters” steal the show), though they sometimes overpowered the male soloists who were singing very low in their ranges, which makes it harder to project in a room without very good acoustics. They were all very true to their roles and stayed in character, even when I saw one audience member start to giggle in Henry’s face during a dramatic moment in the closing number. So, well done to the cast for making the most of a less than ideal situation.

The crowd was larger, and I think on the whole taller, which meant I could not see nearly as well as during the first show. At least half of the action takes place right in front of the band, and so directly in front of a bank of stage lights which also made it harder to see. I would love to see this show again staged as a traditional musical where I could get all the action from start to finish. (I think the best place to stand for this one is near the free-standing gas lights on the near wall as you enter the space.) Because I knew the basic story already (though I haven’t read the original yet) I wasn’t surprised by the turns of events, but I didn’t feel that the dialogue did enough to move Dorian from one stage of his thinking to another. I would have liked to see him first fall in love with his painting and then become jealous rather than his first reaction to be disdainful. I also liked that the homosexual undertones were brought to the forefront, but I found the scene where Dorian and Basil kiss to feel strange and I expected to see Basil more swept up and given hope rather than saddened. But on the whole the acting was very good even if the actors made different choices than I would have.

If you only choose one Victorian Vices show to see, I would say go with Sweeny Todd for the dynamic staging and charismatic Todd and Lovett. Dorian Gray was very well done, it just didn’t work as well in the space. If you have comfy shoes, they are great to see back-to-back for a great night of entertainment. The soundtracks for both shows will be available soon, and I highly recommend them!

Both shows are running from now until the 23rd, so don’t miss your chance to taste a little vice.

Get tickets here: tickets.edfringe.com

Learn more about Another Soup at their website: www.anothersoup.co.uk